Body Piercing

QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER BEFORE GETTING YOUR BODY ART

Getting a tattoo or body piercing is a very important decision. You should make sure that this is something that you truly want and will not regret years later. While piercings may close up, they often leave permanent scars. Genital piercing can cause painful neuromas, neurofibromas, and neuralgia. Before getting any form of body art, make sure that you are emotionally and mentally stable. The following are some things that you might want to consider. If you answer no to any of these questions, then you may want to give yourself more time to think about your decision.

QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR BODY PIERCING ARTIST

Anyone who is receiving a piercing has the right to ask about the artist’s training and experience. If the artist refuses or seems hesitant to answer your questions, it may be best for you to go somewhere else. Before you get a piercing you should ask the following questions to ensure your safety:

HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT STUDIO

In order to choose an appropriate studio, you should visit the facility and consider the following:

YOUR RIGHTS

Please remember that everyone who is receiving a piercing has the following rights. You have the right to:

PIERCING AFTERCARE

Flesh piercing

Oral piercing

TATTOO AFTERCARE

WHAT ARE THE RISKS?

Since tattooing and body piercing regulations are not always properly enforced, some artists do not follow simple health rules that are designed to prevent infection. As a result, there is always a risk of some type of infection when getting a tattoo. The following are some serious infections that are associated with tattooing and piercing.

SIGNS OF INFECTION

If you notice any of these signs when examining your tattoo/piercing or have any concerns, see a doctor immediately.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact the following sources:

References

Akhondi, H. & Rahimi, A. R. (2002). Haemophilus aphrophilus endocarditis after tongue piercing. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 8(8). Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol8no8/pdf/01-0458.pdf.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2010, March 25). HIV Transmission. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/qa/qa27.htm.
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. (2009). Female genital mutilation and its management. Retrieved from http://www.rcog.org.uk/files/rcog-corp/GreenTop53FemaleGenitalMutilation.pdf.